Question: Is A 3.3 WBC Bad?

Is WBC 3.3 too low?

Generally, a count lower than 3,500 white blood cells per microliter of blood is considered a low white blood cell count..

Can stress cause low white cell count?

In addition, stress decreases the body’s lymphocytes — the white blood cells that help fight off infection. The lower your lymphocyte level, the more at risk you are for viruses, including the common cold and cold sores.

What is the most common reason for low white blood cell count?

A low white blood cell count usually is caused by: Viral infections that temporarily disrupt the work of bone marrow. Certain disorders present at birth (congenital) that involve diminished bone marrow function. Cancer or other diseases that damage bone marrow.

What is a dangerously low white blood cell count?

In general, for adults a count lower than 4,000 white blood cells per microliter of blood is considered a low white blood cell count. For children, that threshold varies with age.

What is an alarming WBC count?

WBC counts between 50,000 and 100,000 per microliter usually mean a very severe infection or cancer somewhere in the body. A WBC count over 100,000 most often occurs with leukemia or other blood and bone marrow cancer.

What will happen if low WBC?

White blood cells are produced by your bone marrow to help your body fight infection. If you have fewer than normal white blood cells, you have a higher risk of getting an infection. When you have a low white blood cell count, your immune system isn’t working as well as it should.

Should I be worried if my white blood cell count is low?

A low WBC count can be serious because it increases your risk of developing a potentially life-threatening infection. Seek prompt medical care if you have a low WBC count and have signs of an infection, such as a fever, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, or skin lesions.

Is 2.9 WBC too low?

A white blood cell count of less than 4,000 cells per microliter of blood is considered low.

Does white blood cell count 2.5 mean?

The definition of “normal” depends on the lab that processed your blood results. Generally, though, a normal white blood cell count is 4,000-11,000 per microliter of blood. This is usually reported as 4.0-11.0 thousands/μL.